Moterum Technologies https://moterum.com Patented devices that can help stroke survivors learn how to walk again. Tue, 23 Jul 2019 21:01:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 Walking Speed – Is It REALLY That Important? https://moterum.com/walking-speed/ Tue, 23 Jul 2019 18:41:02 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=351 Spoiler Alert: We Think So! By: Brie Darcy, PT, DPT There has been a lot of buzz in the medical community recently about walking speed. It’s even earned itself a nickname as “the 6th vital sign,” including claims that it may provide as much medical value as more traditional vital signs like blood pressure and […]

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Spoiler Alert: We Think So!

By: Brie Darcy, PT, DPT

There has been a lot of buzz in the medical community recently about walking speed. It’s even earned itself a nickname as “the 6th vital sign,” including claims that it may provide as much medical value as more traditional vital signs like blood pressure and heart rate.1 But is it really as important as they say? Research suggests a resounding YES!

So, why is walking speed such a hot topic? Walking ability—with speed as a significant, measurable factor—often declines as we age. In fact, studies show this decline may accelerate around age 62.2 While a very common phenomenon, a 2014 article entitled “Walking Speed: The Functional Vital Sign” found that a slowed walking speed is correlated to and may even be predictive of many health factors. These health factors include general health status, level of disability, falls, hospitalization risk, quality of life, and even mortality.3 

Conversely, studies show that an improved gait speed can result in positive health outcomes. In a large pooled analysis of nine studies, data from nearly 35,000 community-dwelling older adults showed survival increased significantly in increments of 0.10 m/s.4 Additionally, a study of elderly male veterans showed that every 0.10 m/s increase in walking speed resulted in improved health status, improved physical function, fewer basic disabilities, fewer hospitalization days, and one-year cost reductions of $1188.5 

Why One Easy Measurement Means So Much

Typically developed in infancy, the act of walking is a very complex skill resulting from a coordinated effort of several systems including our neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and cardiopulmonary systems. Walking starts in the brain with a signal that travels to the spinal cord. Nerve cells in the spinal cord activate muscles throughout our body that achieve postural control and the advancement of our limbs.6 Additional systems work together to ensure your steps are the appropriate length and direction, and to achieve a pace that will get you to your desired destination. Don’t forget that strength, balance, proprioception, vision, and aerobic capacity play a role as well!6 

Amazingly, when all of these systems work together in a synchronized fashion, we create the coordinated pattern known as walking. The decline in walking ability and speed as we age, while at times due to a large event such as a stroke or orthopedic injury, more often results from small declines in the functioning of any of these systems.7 

Valuable information about this multi-faceted process can be obtained quickly and easily by measuring walking speed. Unlike many medical assessments, measuring gait speed is quick (taking less than 5 minutes), reliable, easily performed in a variety of settings, and useful in monitoring progress over time. As a result, it has become a highly recommended clinical tool used to identify those at risk for adverse outcomes or in need of intervention.

Okay, You’ve Got My Attention! But How Do I Improve My Walking Speed?

If you are reading this, chances are you (or someone you know) may have been affected by a stroke or other neurological injury. An unfortunate but common consequence of neurological injuries is impaired walking ability and speed. If this sounds familiar, don’t lose hope! Medical research has shown several effective methods can be used to improve walking speed.

1. Impairment-Based Interventions. This method involves breaking down and treating the individual and unique components of gait that may be causing your impairment.7 For example, some individuals may walk with a slower gait speed due to weakness of the leg muscles, limited endurance, or impaired balance. Treating these impairments individually may help to improve your overall walking ability and speed. A research study looking at the most commonly used training techniques found that progressive resistance training at high intensities was the most effective exercise to improve gait speed.8 Similarly, a group of individuals who performed resistance training exercises three times per week for 12 weeks significantly improved their gait speed over a group performing just flexibility exercises.9 

2. Task-Oriented Practice. This refers to practicing the actual task you are trying to improve. If a basketball player wants to improve his or her jump shot … they practice their jump shot. The same logic can apply to walking. If you want to improve your walking, your treatments should involve walking!7 This might include walking drills such as practicing changing speed, changing directions, or stepping over objects. Studies show that this approach may even be superior for improving gait speed, as compared to focusing on the individual gait components.10

  • Music lovers, take note! Studies that included a rhythmic component (such as walking or even dancing while keeping time to music or a rhythm) have shown very promising results for improving gait speed due to the notion that this task performance may train higher brain functions.8

Here at Moterum Technologies …

Our innovative iStride™ Gait System, used to treat hemiparetic gait impairments arising from neurologic injuries, is equipped with sensors that can quickly, easily, and accurately track your gait speed (among other important markers of gait) every time you use it. In our recent clinical trial, participants improved their gait speed by an average of 16.14 meters per minute in just 12 visits!

Curious To Know Your Walking Speed?

It’s easy to measure! First, measure a distance. You can use just about anything, from marks on the ground to chairs in your living room! The most important aspect is to know the distance you’re covering (6 or 10 meters are commonly used). Now grab a stopwatch (most smartphones and tablets have a free timer app), and walk at your comfortable pace. For even more accuracy, start walking several steps before your first mark and give yourself a few steps after the measured distance to stop, so you are walking at your normal walking speed across the entire distance. Just remember to start the timer when you pass the first mark and stop it when you pass the second.

Divide the number of meters you walked by the number of seconds it took, and that’s your walking speed in meters per second! If you are concerned about your walking speed, make an appointment with your doctor or physical therapist. And don’t forget: If you feel your walking difficulties are related to a stroke or other neurologic injury, we are here to help!

References

1. Fritz S, Lusardi M. White paper: “Walking speed: the sixth vital sign”. J Geriatr Phys Ther. 2009;32(2):46-49.

2. Himann JE, Cunningham DA, Rechnitzer PA, Paterson DH. Age-related changes in speed of walking. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1988;20(2):161-166.

3. Middleton A, Fritz SL, Lusardi M. Walking speed: the functional vital sign. J Aging Phys Act. 2015;23(2):314-322.

4. Studenski S, Perera S, Patel K, et al. Gait speed and survival in older adults. JAMA. 2011;305(1):50-58.

5. Purser JL, Weinberger M, Cohen HJ, et al. Walking speed predicts health status and hospital costs for frail elderly male veterans. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2005;42(4):535-546.

6. Takakusaki K. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control. J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):1-17.

7. Brach JS, Vanswearingen JM. Interventions to Improve Walking in Older Adults. Curr Transl Geriatr Exp Gerontol Rep. 2013;2(4).

8. Van Abbema R, De Greef M, Craje C, Krijnen W, Hobbelen H, Van Der Schans C. What type, or combination of exercise can improve preferred gait speed in older adults? A meta-analysis. BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:72.

9. Judge JO, Underwood M, Gennosa T. Exercise to improve gait velocity in older persons. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1993;74(4):400-406.

10. VanSwearingen JM, Perera S, Brach JS, Wert D, Studenski SA. Impact of exercise to improve gait efficiency on activity and participation in older adults with mobility limitations: a randomized controlled trial. Phys Ther. 2011;91(12):1740-1751.

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Caregivers – We’re Here For You, Too. 5 Tips for New Caregivers! https://moterum.com/caregivers-were-here-for-you-too-5-tips-for-new-caregivers/ Tue, 16 Jul 2019 22:18:10 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=348 By: Brie Darcy, PT, DPT When a loved one experiences a stroke, family, friends, and other loved ones may unexpectedly find themselves in a new role: caregiver. Unlike chronic or other progressive illnesses, a stroke often provides little or no warning. Additionally, with a 44% increase in the number of young Americans hospitalized due to stroke […]

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By: Brie Darcy, PT, DPT

When a loved one experiences a stroke, family, friends, and other loved ones may unexpectedly find themselves in a new role: caregiver. Unlike chronic or other progressive illnesses, a stroke often provides little or no warning. Additionally, with a 44% increase in the number of young Americans hospitalized due to stroke over the last decade, a stroke can occur at a much younger age than may be on your medical radar.1 As a result of these circumstances, the majority of stroke survivors and new caregivers feel unprepared or overwhelmed when this rapid (and often life-altering) change occurs.

While the responsibility of caregiving can be a large one, the right resources, knowledge, and support can make this unexpected situation manageable (and even rewarding). We’ve put together some of our best tips and advice for new caregivers.

5 Tips For New Caregivers

1. Do Your Research.

Knowledge is power. Unless you work in the medical field or have personal experience with stroke, the diagnosis may seem foreign and scary. Take advantage of every opportunity to learn about your loved one’s condition and expected prognosis. Talk to doctors, nurses, and therapists. Ask questions. Join stroke support groups where you can meet individuals in similar situations and share advice, resources, and tips. If you are unable to attend support groups in person, many groups are available online through sites such as Facebook. Additionally, organizations such as The National Stroke Association and the American Stroke Association provide a wealth of information on their websites including medical information, caregiver guides, and links to support groups and other resources. There are also a number of books written by stroke survivors and their caregivers that may provide unique and helpful perspectives.

2. Rehabilitation Is Key.

Rehabilitation professionals (including physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech therapists) provide a wealth of knowledge on stroke recovery. If your loved one has continued impairments resulting from their stoke (such as weakness, mobility impairments, balance issues, falls, decreased independence, or speech impairments), rehabilitation professionals can help. Depending of the extent of the impairments, therapy can be provided in the inpatient, outpatient, or even home settings. Your insurance representative can inform you of your coverage and any expected costs for these services.

3. Maximize Your Resources.

While the majority of caregiving services are hired and paid privately, certain insurance providers (including Medicaid, Veterans programs, and Medicare Advantage) may offer provisions for additional caregiving services in certain circumstances. Additionally, many states have unique programs that provide support, such as financial compensation to family caregivers, paid work leave, transportation, meal delivery, or minor home revisions. These programs are targeted at helping individuals remain in their homes as they age or after illness. The website www.eldercare.gov can help you locate resources in your community. Please note that eligibility requirements (such as age or income) may apply and differ across states.

4. Practice Prevention.

Having a stroke puts survivors at risk for a second stroke. Take steps to minimize that risk by encouraging a healthy lifestyle, taking medications as prescribed, and keeping doctor and therapy appointments. Remember the warning signs of stroke by memorizing the acronym F.A.S.T.

  • Face drooping. Smile and see if one side of the face droops. 
  • Arm weakness. Raise both arms. Does one arm drop down?
  • Speech difficulty. Say a short phrase and check for slurred or strange speech.
  • Time. If the person shows any of the symptoms above, call 911 right away and write down the time the symptoms started.

It is also important to be aware that the risk of depression is elevated in stroke survivors with reported rates of approximately 30%. Individuals with prior depression or a severe stroke are especially at risk.2 Post-stroke depression can be described as a feeling of hopelessness that interferes with function and quality of life. Additionally, it can interfere with stroke recovery. There are a variety of treatments available for post-stroke depression. Consult your physician as soon as possible if you feel your loved one might be experiencing depression.

5. Caregivers Need Care Too!

You’ve heard the flight attendant say it: “In case of emergency, please apply your oxygen mask first, before helping others.” This important motto of survival carries forward into the caregiving world. We can’t provide our best to others if we don’t take care of ourselves. Several tips that may help include:

  1. Ask For Help. Even in the best of circumstances, caregiving is a challenging role. If someone offers to help, let them! Don’t hesitate to define what you need and ask family, friends, or neighbors for assistance with errands, meals, yard work, cleaning, or other tasks that may alleviate some of your responsibilities.
  2. Don’t Neglect Your Own Health. It’s easy to forget our own medical needs when caring for others. Be sure to follow-up on your own healthcare needs including regular doctor visits and taking medications as prescribed. Staying strong and healthy benefits yourself and your loved one.
  3. Take A Break. Caregiving can be physically and emotionally challenging, and caregivers are subject to burnout and fatigue without regular breaks. It’s important to recharge your batteries! Consider looking into respite care opportunities. Respite care provides short term relief for primary caregivers (costs can vary by insurance and other funding sources). For more information, visit https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-respite-care.
  4. Practice Self Care. Remember, your own needs are important too! We suggest the following:
    • Find time for your own hobbies or other interests at least once a week. (Or more!)
    • Talk or spend time with a supportive friend.
    • Try to get adequate sleep. Rest or nap if needed. 
    • Say “no”  to non-essential tasks that provide additional stress, or delegate them to others.
    • Consider journaling. Journaling can provide an outlet for emotions and stress management.
    • Prioritize exercise. Exercise is important for physical and emotional health, and regular physical exercise can help relieve stress. Even a short walk can provide physical benefits and help clear the mind.
    • Give yourself credit, or a least a pat on the back. Caregiving is not easy and you are doing your best!!

References

1. National Stroke Association. Young Stroke Survivors. https://www.stroke.org/understand-stroke/impact-of-stroke/young-stroke-survivors/. Published 2019. Accessed 2019, June 20.

2. Jorgensen TS, Wium-Andersen IK, Wium-Andersen MK, et al. Incidence of Depression After Stroke, and Associated Risk Factors and Mortality Outcomes, in a Large Cohort of Danish Patients. JAMA Psychiatry. 2016;73(10):1032-1040.

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Breaking Through With Moterum – Stories of Success! https://moterum.com/breaking-through-with-moterum-stories-of-success/ Mon, 01 Jul 2019 23:23:00 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=347 By: Brie Darcy, PT, DPT You may have read our recent article on the recovery plateau in stroke rehabilitation and tips for breaking through a recovery plateau. Plateaus can look like a slowing or stalling of your stroke recovery. Often occurring several months post-stroke, they can signal it’s time for a modification or a new […]

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By: Brie Darcy, PT, DPT

You may have read our recent article on the recovery plateau in stroke rehabilitation and tips for breaking through a recovery plateau. Plateaus can look like a slowing or stalling of your stroke recovery. Often occurring several months post-stroke, they can signal it’s time for a modification or a new challenge to be added to your rehabilitation program.

In our clinical trials, the iStride™ Gait Solution has helped many individuals break through these plateaus years (and even decades) post-stroke! Take a look below at the inspiring stories of James and Catherine, who have gained new hope after using the iStride™ device.

James

After suffering a stroke in 2016, James experienced significant weakness on one side of his body, leaving him reliant on a cane with a very slow and unstable walking pattern. This limited mobility affected his confidence as well as his ability to engage in previously rewarding hobbies and relationships. Eager to improve his physical condition, James agreed to participate in a clinical trial with the iStrideTM device.  Initial testing, using three validated balance measures aimed at identifying his risk for falls, showed that James was a “high fall risk.” In addition, his slow walking speed limited him as a “home ambulator,” meaning his walking speed was likely too slow for successful participation in community activities.

After only 3 treatment sessions, James was able to use the iStrideTM device unassisted and even noticed his walking speed was becoming faster when he took the device off. After 12 treatment sessions, balance and walking tests were repeated to assess for improvement after using the iStrideTM device. Excitingly, the results revealed James had improved his gait speed by 220%, walking over 3 times as fast as before using the device! Additionally, his scores on our 3 balance tests moved him from high risk for falls to low risk! From James’ perspective, he described improved confidence with his walking and balance as well as improved ease of standing up and turning. He was even able to stop using his cane at home and begin participating in hobbies with his friends again. After completing the iStrideTM device treatment, James reflected that his greatest benefit was feeling increased freedom now that he can finally keep up with friends and family again. ☺ Way to go James!!

Catherine

After suffering a stroke in her early 20’s, Catherine’s life immediately changed. Previously athletic and employed full-time, she became reliant on her spouse for basic needs. Through intensive rehabilitation and determination, Catherine regained the ability to walk, but she continued to have a leg that “dragged” while walking, which limited her confidence about participating in community activities. After several decades of unchanged physical status, Catherine had accepted her condition as permanent, but she always hoped for continued improvement.

Catherine agreed to participate in our clinical trial and was treated with the iStrideTM device for 12 sessions in her home. Initial testing showed that Catherine walked with a gait speed category of only “limited community activities.” She also scored as a high fall risk on 2 of our fall prediction tests. After a one-month treatment period, Catherine was able to improve the speed of her walking by over 63% and significantly reduce her fall risk! Her score improved 40% on a self-assessment used to quantify the impact of a stroke on one’s quality of life. After believing there was no room for progress in her stroke recovery for over 20 years, these results are tremendous!

At Moterum Technologies, through the use of innovative and clinically proven technology, our goal is to provide stroke survivors and their loved ones with hope for a full life after a stroke. See if our technology is a good fit for you! For more information on the patented iStride™ Gait Solution, visit us at www.moterum.com.

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iStride™ Gait Solution Featured in Cox Communications Smart Home Events https://moterum.com/istridegait-solution-featured-in-cox-communications-smart-home-events/ Tue, 02 Apr 2019 16:57:20 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=293 By Lauren Rashford, DPT Wow! What an amazing opportunity Moterum Technologies had last week being a part of the Cox Communications Smart Home Event in Louisiana. This was our second appearance at a Cox Communications “Smart Home” event, where Cox features technologies that help people continue to live at home, independently! In 2019, for the […]

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By Lauren Rashford, DPT

Wow! What an amazing opportunity Moterum Technologies had last week being a part of the Cox Communications Smart Home Event in Louisiana. This was our second appearance at a Cox Communications “Smart Home” event, where Cox features technologies that help people continue to live at home, independently!

In 2019, for the first time in history, the average person in the United States is likely to live to at least 79 years old. Nearly 90 percent of adults over the age of 65 want to stay in their current home and community as they age. By 2020, we will have more than 119 million senior citizens living in the United States. These statistics are inspiring some of today’s most impressive innovations, allowing them to age in place, stay in their homes, and achieve connected independence.

Why did Cox Communications choose the iStride™ Gait Solution to be a part of the Cox Smart Home showcase? Because its primary purpose is to help stroke survivors improve their walking, using cutting-edge technology in their own home environment!

Moterum Technologies fits right into this idea of being “fully connected.” Not only does our iStride™ Gait Solution for stroke survivors promote progress in the home, but it also supports building an entire community of connected neural survivors and their caregivers. More than 85% of survivors prefer to do their rehabilitation at home. Not everyone has the resources or the accessibility to get to a clinic 2-3 times a week for rehab. So, let’s do something about this! Our “survivor community” will give people the opportunity to share their progress and movement throughout the day with anyone they choose, right from their own home, and will allow other survivors to challenge each other with day to day mobility challenges!

The iStride™ Gait Solution will be easy to use, designed to be an extension of a patient’s efforts in a rehab center and connecting to the cloud to track results in collaboration with a rehab team. Over time, those results will help fine tune an individual’s rehab program for faster, better results, while doing it all in the comfort of their own home. In fact, in clinical trials the iStride™ Gait Solution has already shown significant results in reducing the risk of falling, increasing gait speed, and improving functional walking ability for stroke survivors many years after a stroke, often when they are no longer even receiving traditional therapy.

Through Moterum’s cloud technology, patients and their caregivers can collaborate in teams on a daily basis in their own home! The iStride™ Gait Solution will incorporate artificial intelligence, machine learning, and cloud technologies—bringing the most powerful tools of the information age to the future of stroke gait rehabilitation.

Moterum will also be a featured company on April 4, 2019, at the Cox Communications Smart Home event in Rhode Island!

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Moterum to Be Featured at HIMSS19 in the Healthcare of the Future Pavilion https://moterum.com/moterum-to-be-featured-at-himss19-in-the-healthcare-of-the-future-pavilion/ Sun, 10 Feb 2019 20:23:14 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=272 The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. HIMSS. It might not roll off the tongue, but their annual conference is the leading conference on health information and technology. More than 45,000 health professionals from over 90 countries gather each year to learn about the most exciting technological advancements coming down the pike, and this year, […]

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The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. HIMSS. It might not roll off the tongue, but their annual conference is the leading conference on health information and technology. More than 45,000 health professionals from over 90 countries gather each year to learn about the most exciting technological advancements coming down the pike, and this year, Moterum will be featured in the Healthcare of the Future pavilion.

Throughout the conference, held from February 11-15 in the Orange County Convention Center of Orlando, Florida, the Healthcare of the Future pavilion will present a collection of profoundly innovative medical devices, many of which are now in the clinical trial phase of development. Moterum is proud to be featured among this distinguished list of companies and technologies that are poised to transform the healthcare industry.

Why did they choose the iStride™ System? Because it’s designed to take advantage of cutting-edge technology.

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and cloud technologies stand at the forefront of a medical revolution. You’ve probably heard about artificial intelligence, often shortened to AI. This is the general name for the field of computer science that tries to make computers act more like people, from recognizing faces to mimicking human speech. Machine learning is a critical subset of AI, and it’s exactly what it sounds like—trying to build computers that can learn.

If that sounds like science fiction, well, it isn’t. Not anymore. There are already computers that have learned to win games against human opponents through trial and error. The thing that has computer scientists all agog here is that the computers were not directly programmed to win. They were programmed to learn how to win in the same way that people learn—by trying different things and finding out what works. While video games might be fun and flashy, imagine the possibilities if this same technology were applied to medical advancement.

So what about cloud technology? Isn’t that the thing that lets people collaborate on projects and synch their calendars? It is that, but it’s a lot more than that, too. Humanity’s greatest achievements are made possible by teamwork. You don’t put a human being on the moon by standing in a field by yourself and staring into the sky. You do it by gathering mathematicians, physicists, chemists, engineers, and a whole host of dedicated souls, including a few who just might be brave enough to escape the atmosphere and touch the cosmos.

Most importantly, you do it together. Cloud technology allows patients and their caregivers to collaborate in teams on a daily basis, even if the patient doesn’t live anywhere near a rehab facility. Over time, it also allows a tremendous amount of data to be gathered about what does and doesn’t work. Computers can use those statistics to help human caregivers craft the very best rehab program for each individual, pushing areas like stroke rehabilitation to new levels of care that have never before been possible.

Presenting the iStride™ System — The Future of Stroke Gait Rehabilitation

Designed to assist stroke victims in improving their mobility and independence by rehabilitating their gait, even years after a stroke, the iStride™ System will incorporate all three—artificial intelligence, machine learning, and cloud technologies—bringing the most powerful tools of the information age to the future of stroke gait rehabilitation.

The iStride™ System will be easy to use at home, designed to be an extension of a patient’s efforts in a rehab center and connecting to the cloud to track results in collaboration with a rehab team. Over time, those results will help fine tune an individual’s rehab program for faster, better results. In fact, in clinical trials the iStride™ System has already shown significant results for stroke survivors many years after a stroke, often when they are no longer even receiving traditional therapy.

We’ll be in the Healthcare of the Future pavilion throughout the conference (booth #5359), and we’ll be presenting a special session about the iStride™ System on Tuesday, February 12, from 11:15 – 11:35 AM. For more information on the iStride™ device or our clinical trials in the home setting, visit https://moterum.com/clinical-trials/.  The Moterum iStride™ device, helping the world’s stroke survivors relearn how to walk one step at a time.™

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Counting Steps Matters! https://moterum.com/counting-steps-matters/ Thu, 10 Jan 2019 20:16:41 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=270 Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Through Step Tracking—Why Step Count Can Make a Difference One of the most important aspects of stroke recovery and rehabilitation is, quite simply, continuing to work the program. Especially once you get home. But it’s a frustrating process. In fact, stroke recovery and rehabilitation is so frustrating that the National Stroke […]

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Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Through Step Tracking—Why Step Count Can Make a Difference

One of the most important aspects of stroke recovery and rehabilitation is, quite simply, continuing to work the program. Especially once you get home. But it’s a frustrating process. In fact, stroke recovery and rehabilitation is so frustrating that the National Stroke Association (https://www.stroke.org ) devotes entire sections of its Stroke Recovery Guide (https://www.stroke.org/hopeguide_2016_final_online/) to dealing with emotional changes after a stroke, up to and including depression.

But that same guide is titled HOPE for a reason. There are things that help. And one of the most important is working toward measurable goals.

What makes a goal measurable?

Measurable goals are specific. “Getting around more,” for example, might be what you ultimately want, but it isn’t specific enough to be measurable. By contrast, goals like “I will walk from my bedroom to the kitchen and back every morning,” or “I will walk once around the block twice each week” are measurable because you can track how well you’re doing and measure your rehab progress.

Organizations like the Toronto Stroke Networks (http://strokerecovery.guide/stroke-healthcare-journey/ ) recommend measurable goals for stroke recovery and rehabilitation because tracking your progress can help you stick with it. And it can help your recovery team adjust your rehab regimen so you keep progressing instead of hitting a plateau and stalling out.

Step count is extremely measurable.

When it comes to stroke recovery and rehabilitation, counting steps is a highly specific and measurable goal. Did you take five steps today? A dozen? A hundred? Tracking your steps every day can provide a visible graph of your progress over time. It’s a useful tool for yourself, and for your rehabilitation team—to help you stay on target.

So does that mean you have to count those steps yourself and write them down every day? Fortunately, no. There are tools available in the modern world to do that for you. Fitness watches are a popular training option, but they don’t literally count steps. They use algorithms that involve guesswork. Wareable, for example, noted that “Anything from a bumpy car ride to a plush carpet can throw off the accuracy of your fitness tracker.”

That’s why we’re building our iStride™ device with step tracking capability.

Whether in a rehab facility or at home, the iStride™ device will keep track of every single step you take on the device, and it will upload those steps to the cloud (assuming it has access to the Internet). In short, it will count every step of your rehab session and track them for you, so that you—and your stroke recovery and rehabilitation team—can see exactly how well you’re doing.

According to organizations like the National Stroke Association (https://www.stroke.org ), tracking your rehab progress is an important part of keeping it moving forward. If you’re stuck, you’ll know it’s time to make some adjustments. And if you’re meeting your goals consistently, you’ll know it’s time to set some new ones!

For more information on the iStride™ device or our clinical trials in the home setting, visit https://moterum.com/clinical-trials/.  The Moterum iStride™ device, helping the world’s stroke survivors relearn how to walk one step at a time.™

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Don’t Stop Walking! https://moterum.com/dont-stop-walking/ Fri, 14 Sep 2018 01:15:52 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=226 By Lauren Rashford, DPT, Director of Clinical Operations and Customer Development  of Moterum Technologies. Walking really may be the best medicine yet… Did you know that there have been more and more studies showing that walking can truly improve your overall health? Here, at Moterum Technologies, we are dedicated to helping improve stroke patient’s lives […]

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By Lauren Rashford, DPT, Director of Clinical Operations and Customer Development  of Moterum Technologies.

Walking really may be the best medicine yet…

Did you know that there have been more and more studies showing that walking can truly improve your overall health? Here, at Moterum Technologies, we are dedicated to helping improve stroke patient’s lives one step and a time. In order to do that we will continually provide you with the most up to date research to help you improve your quality of life!

In a large studypublished in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM) , they found that regularly walking at an average, brisk, or fast pace was associated with a 20% reduction in all-cause mortality and a 24% reduction in the risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease. This is huge! We are already deep into our clinical trials with our iStrideTMdevice, which is demonstrating significant improvements in gait speed and increased steps per day! Our participants have made comments such as:

 “ I am walking more than I ever have since my stroke “ – 2 years post stroke

“ My walking speed is much better than before”- 1 year post stroke

“My overall confidence in walking and moving around is much better now because I feel like my leg is stronger”  – 3 years post stroke

A studypublished in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, came to the same conclusion stating that engaging in at least 150 minutes per week of brisk walking was related to a 20% decrease in all-cause mortality.

Confidence does make a difference! We want to help foster your ability to keep walking and stay motivated. Whether you walk in your community or come out to a walk to support stroke survivors, you can do this!

If you have not yet joined our Clinical Trials in Charlotte, NC, or are interested in our device or getting involved in a clinical trials in some other way, click the link below.  We are excited to talk with you!

https://moterum.com/clinical-trials/#join

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Video of CEO David Huizenga presenting at Cavendish Global Forum https://moterum.com/video-of-ceo-david-huizenga-presenting-at-cavendish-global-forum/ Tue, 21 Aug 2018 14:47:07 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=215 As you may recall, Moterum was chosen as an innovation partner of Cavendish Global and invited to speak at their event in July.  The Cavendish producers provided this video of our CEO, David Huizenga, speaking about the impact of stroke gait problems around the world, and the unique and powerful solution that Moterum’s iStrideTM platform […]

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As you may recall, Moterum was chosen as an innovation partner of Cavendish Global and invited to speak at their event in July.  The Cavendish producers provided this video of our CEO, David Huizenga, speaking about the impact of stroke gait problems around the world, and the unique and powerful solution that Moterum’s iStrideTM platform will bring to the market.  We at Moterum are excited to have an opportunity to help stroke survivors learn to walk again, one step at a time.

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How important are 10,000 steps? https://moterum.com/how-important-are-10000-steps/ Tue, 31 Jul 2018 02:20:02 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=210             The benefits of walking for overall health, longevity, and the quality of life are well accepted. As long as one’s physician has not curtailed walking for some reason, generally all scientists and clinicians agree that the more steps one can take the more benefit one gets.  Some studies have even shown that if one […]

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            The benefits of walking for overall health, longevity, and the quality of life are well accepted. As long as one’s physician has not curtailed walking for some reason, generally all scientists and clinicians agree that the more steps one can take the more benefit one gets.  Some studies have even shown that if one can achieve more than 15,000 steps a day, risk of cardiovascular disease can go to near zero! (https://www.nature.com/articles/ijo201730).  Most people cannot get 15,000 steps in a day even if in excellent physical condition, but a valuable target is to try to get 5,000 steps a day.  Catrine Tudor-Locke, chair of kinesiology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has said, “The crucial public health message is to get at least 5,000 steps a day . . .  if you don’t hit 5,000, your health will eventually suffer.” (http://time.com/4745061/how-many-steps-walking/).  We at Moterum take a less specific approach: we simply want people to be able to walk more steps.  We leave it to others to determine lifestyle step goals, but firmly believe that if one is able to improve their walking and the quantity of their walking, good things will happen. Our mission is to help make lives better for stroke survivors because that’s what drives us.  We do this by creating scientifically designed and innovative solutions to help people become more mobile through improving their gait.  For more information on the iStrideTM device or our clinical trials in the home setting click here (https://moterum.com/clinical-trials/).  The Moterum iStrideTMdevice, helping the world’s stroke survivors relearn how to walk one step at a time.TM

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Clinical Trial in Progress! https://moterum.com/clinical-trial-in-progress/ Sun, 22 Jul 2018 20:04:20 +0000 https://moterum.com/?p=206 Moterum Technologies is excited to announce that we have officially started our Home-Based Clinical Trial Study in Charlotte, NC! We have 10 participants who are in progress with their treatment on our iStrideTMdevice, and we continue to enroll more each day! Our participants range from 6 months post stroke to 10 years post stroke. They […]

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Moterum Technologies is excited to announce that we have officially started our Home-Based Clinical Trial Study in Charlotte, NC! We have 10 participants who are in progress with their treatment on our iStrideTMdevice, and we continue to enroll more each day! Our participants range from 6 months post stroke to 10 years post stroke. They are all super motivated to participate!

We also have a prestigious group of licensed physical therapists that have joined our study team! Our study team includes Doctor’s of Physical Therapy with Board Certifications in Neurology as well as extensive experience with stroke rehabilitation.

We have a great device that has already demonstrated its ability to improve stroke patients gait symmetry, including gait speed and balance. If you have not yet signed up for our paid clinical trial study, please contact us or visit our website to sign up!

Contact Information:

Lauren@moterumtechnologies.com

315.335.9622

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